Captain Rainbow: Absurd Nintendo Nostalgia

Captain Rainbow: Absurd Nintendo Nostalgia

Though Skip’s cheerfully offbeat games, such as the Miyamoto-backed Chibi-Robo, have yet to turn into substantial commercial successes, they have garnered the company attention and popularity outside of the traditional videogame market in Japan. With Nintendo’s support giving the developer access to its back catalogue of characters, it may be that Skip’s latest game, Captain Rainbow, will tap into the nostalgia of the hardcore gamer too.

Poignantly, however, the characters that Captain Rainbow lifts from previous Nintendo titles are purposefully obscure. No Mario or Link here: instead, Captain Rainbow features a roster of 8bit-era bit-part players who are at risk of fading from memory altogether. For this reason they have all sought out the legendary Mimin Island, hoping that its mystical powers will grant them another shot at fame and fortune.

As Captain Rainbow, also known as Nick, you have your own dreams of heroism to fulfil. By collecting the objects scattered across the island you’re able to call down a star, which, once transported to a sacred place, will fulfil one wish. But things are not quite that easy – the island is populated by shadow creatures who will attempt to steal back the star, and you may be persuaded to fulfil the wishes of the island’s washed-up characters instead of your own. But isn’t that what true heroism is all about? As well as being a novel repurposing of Nintendo’s numerous aging properties, Captain Rainbow promises to be a rather touching game, very much in step with the warmth and heartfelt characterisation of Chibi-Robo. If life imitates art, then Captain Rainbow may just give some NES-era NPCs a new lease of life.

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