Activision Set to Sell Sierra

Activision Set to Sell Sierra

Activision says it may sell off some of its Vivendi studios in an attempt to “better align” the company’s development operations.

Since Vivendi joined with Activision last year, much speculation has been growing about the company’s plans. Activision Publishing CEO Mike Griffith said Monday that the company is looking at selling off classic publishing label Sierra as well as its affiliated studios.

He said the firm will “realign staffing at Radical Entertainment and High Moon Studios” and is exploring “the possibility of divestiture” of Massive Entertainment and Swordfish Studios. He also said Sierra could be up for sale as well as Vivendi’s mobile games operations.

Griffith said, "We are focused on improving efficiency across the combined organization and are concentrating on businesses where we have leadership positions that are aligned with Activision Publishing’s long-term corporate objectives."

He said that top-selling Vivendi licenses and properties would be safe for the future including Crash Bandicoot, Ice Age and Spyro as well as new IP Prototype and an unnamed game.

"Four of the five properties that we are keeping will be wholly owned properties that further bolster our strong brand portfolio," said Griffith. "We are very excited to add such recognizable and successful brands which reinforce our leadership position in movie-based and family entertainment video games."

He added, “"We have conducted a thorough review of Vivendi Games’ brand portfolio and are retaining those franchises and titles that are a strong fit with our long-term product strategy. We are reviewing our options regarding those titles that we will not be publishing."

Sierra has a long and storied history in the games market, stretching back to the late 1970s, when it began publishing adventure games.  It is best known for 1980s hits such as King’s Quest and Leisure Suit Larry. More recently, it released the highly regarded  World in Conflict.