Ninja Theory’s Antoniades: Xbox One is “completely the wrong direction”, mobile is the future

Fightback_s

UPDATE: Ninja Theory has given us the below statement to clarify Tameem Antionades’ comments in Helsinki last week: “Although we’re very excited by mobile opportunities, and the release of our first mobile title Fightback, we are not transitioning to a mobile only studio. We are currently developing for both mobile and console platforms and intend to… Continue reading

DmC: Devil May Cry review

DmC Devil May Cry review

Any lingering concerns you may have about Ninja Theory’s restyled Dante will fade within the first few hours. This, despite involving surely the most controversial haircut in videogame history, is still a Devil May Cry game, and a good one. This Dante may be the brattish, obnoxious sort of cocky, but only at the outset, when he’s the orphan with the sad past who’s gone off the rails, spending his days in a trailer park and his nights in strip clubs. Nothing, though, focuses the wayward mind quite like being dragged into Limbo by a demon the size of a skyscraper or two.

DmC: Devil May Cry’s artists on why life in Limbo is anything but dull

DMC-Limbo

Ninja Theory’s art has proved a valuable bulwark in games where the action is less dependable. Whatever you might think of combat in Heavenly Sword and Enslaved, there’s no denying the joy of watching their concepts turn into realtime via Hollywood techniques. DmC isn’t just shaping up to be a legitimate Devil May Cry, but is by far the most kinetic and reactive from an environmental standpoint. Truly psychedelic at times, it shows that the rainbow-coloured Enslaved was no Unreal Engine fluke, as technical art director Stuart Adcock and concept artist Alessandro ‘Talexi’ Taini explain.

With DmC: Devil May Cry, Ninja Theory is set to deliver a divine spin on Dante

DmC-fallen-angel

History’s repeating in DmC, Ninja Theory’s hotly debated reboot of Capcom’s treasured Devil May Cry series. You don’t realise just how much, though, until you see Caravaggio’s The Taking Of Christ and David With The Head Of Goliath recast with a rebellious young Dante in one instance battling the cops (rather than armoured soldiers) and in the other holding a freshly chopped-off demon’s head.