Fallen London’s creator on why free-to-play could be the future of storytelling

Fallen London

Writing and storytelling in games is often seen as a bit of a joke – window-dressing for bigger explosions, or weak justification for increasingly lavish bloodshed. Even indie developers are reluctant to place script at the centre of their games, because it’s tough to sell story in an industry with such disregard for it. One notable exception, however, is Alexis Kennedy from Failbetter Games, the UK studio behind Fallen London.

Alex Garland: My Favourite Game

Alex Garland: My Favourite Game

Novelist and screenwriter Alex Garland has explored genres in his film projects ranging from zombies (28 Days Later) to interstellar sci-fi (Sunshine) to comic book fantasy (Dredd). It shouldn’t come as any surprise, then, that he’s also a lifelong gamer. Here, we talk to him about his contribution to the ill-fated Halo movie, the oversaturation of zombie games and the action-RPG that awakened his love of single-player console gaming.

Videogame censorship is damaging

Videogame censorship is damaging

One of my favourite podcasts, The Partially Examined Life, features a gang of postgraduate dropouts discussing philosophy in erudite and entertaining fashion, and occasionally swearing. Unfortunately, Apple disapproves of ‘bad words’, and so forces me to look at a bright red ‘EXPLICIT’ tag next to every episode in iTunes.

Videogame designers: ignore entitled fans

Videogame designers: ignore entitled fans

Greetings, gamers of 2012. My name is Game Designer #9384, although I once had a mother and she called me Bobby. I write to you in secret from the dank, lightless barracks of the High Lord Gamer Melvin Fauntleroy. The year is 2020. Trans-temporal email has just been invented, so you can expect a lot more messages like this, mostly about cybernetic erectile augmentation and desperate princes in the Sovereign Republic Of Texas. Your primitive spam filters will be useless. I pray this message reaches you before Google adds the Block Future Email button.

Videogame writing: a question of control

Videogame writing: a question of control

At most gatherings of games development people, there’s likely to be a writer holding forth annoyingly, wearing the regulation black T-shirt and, increasingly, in this shallow day and age, sporting a ‘haircut’.The writer will be telling everyone how he or she really should be brought in earlier on every project, and how nobody really understands how integral the writing is. This is despite the fact that everyone understands how integral the writing is. And despite the fact that teams usually know exactly the right moment to bring in a writer.